ACNC announces four charity revocations

The ACNC has revoked the charity status of four entities following investigations into their operations and activities.

The entities are:

  • Newcastle Night Angels Homeless Care Incorporated, which has been operating since 2013 and is based in New South Wales.  It was endorsed by the ATO as a deductible-gift recipient (DGR) and was also endorsed to access Commonwealth income-tax concessions as a public benevolent institution.
  • St Andrews Children Neighbourhood Centre Inc, which has been operating since 2000 and is based in New South Wales. It was endorsed by the ATO to access Commonwealth GST concessions, the FBT rebate, and income-tax exemption.
  • Balranald Aboriginal Health Service Incorporated, which has been operating since 2001 and is based in New South Wales.  It was endorsed by the ATO as a DGR, and was also endorsed to access as a public benevolent institution GST concessions, FBT exemption and income-tax exemption.
  • Xin Yi Dai Inc, which began operating in November 1999 and is based in Victoria.  It was endorsed by the ATO to operate a fund with DGR status.  The entity had also been endorsed to access GST concessions, the FBT rebate, and income-tax exemption.

The charities have 60 days to object to the ACNC’s revocations.

Commissioner Susan Pascoe AM said that the ACNC’s ‘compliance activity starts with education and guidance’.  The commission was committed, though, to maintaining and protecting public trust and confidence in the sector.  ‘When we find serious circumstances of mismanagement or deliberate breaches of the ACNC Act we will revoke charity status’, she said.

‘The overwhelming majority of people running charities do the right thing for the benefit of the community.  However, since the establishment of the ACNC we have found a small group that are not willing to meet their obligations and, in some cases, are purposely using a charity as a vehicle for private benefit.’

The ACNC is prevented from disclosing further details due to secrecy provisions.  The commission publishes instances, however, in which it uses its formal powers, including revocation, on the register.

Concerns can be raised by calling 13 ACNC or by visiting acnc.gov.au/raiseaconcern.